Mount Athos: The 17th century arsenal tower and boathouse of the Ivéron Monastery from the sea

Department Archive
Collection SPHS BSA Image Collection
Reference No. BSA SPHS 01/4208.8581
Level Item
Description Film negative, approximately quarter plate size, an original negative.
Dimensions 11 x 8.5 cm
Place Ivéron Monastery
Mount Athos
Dates 1911
Creator Hasluck, Dr Frederick William
Collection event Mount Athos (Hasluck) 1911
Scope and Content Part of a series of images taken by F.W. Hasluck during the course of his visit to Mount Athos in 1911. The original description in the SPHS register reads: "Athos: Ivéron, "arsenal" from sea (1622-5)".
Notes Date based on Hasluck's visit to Mount Athos to research his book, Mount Athos and its Monasteries (1924). Arsenals are port towers (arsanades) often associated with boat houses, located on the coast near the associated monastery.
Further information Iveron - the Monastery of the Iberians" (after the foreign term for the medieval Georgian kingdom of Kartli) - was founded ca. 980 and said to occupy the site of the previous Clement Monastery. Iveron's chapel of the Baptist (Timios Prodromos) probably marks the spot of the previous monastery's katholikon which, in turn, was said to have been constructed on a temple of Poseidon. The founders of Iveron were three Georgians, two of whom were monks from Lavra. The initial building of the katholikon, dedicated to the Dormition of the Virgin, dates to this early period. According to a chronicle of Iveron, the monastery was sacked in the 13th century and remained in a depressed state until the 15th century when a mission was sent from Georgia to re-built. Fortunes reversed again and in the 17th century restoration work was carried out with Georgian, Moldo-Wallachian and other funds. Hasluck, when he visited in 1911, remarks that the monastery had suffered after the fire of 1860, but newer (post-fire) buildings had been constructed to blend in with the old-fashioned style.
Hasluck, F.W. 1924. Athos and its Monasteries, London: Kegan Paul (pp. 162-167)